Friday, February 09, 2007

WHERE WAS I? As usual, it's in one of the five boroughs. This time around, there will be no visual clues. Leave your guesses in the comments section...and score a bonus point if you get it in the first twenty guesses or if you get the correct answer on Valentine's Day.

46 comments:

Debbie said...

Manhattan?

David Marc Fischer said...

Nope!

Scott said...

Is this a Queens thing?

David Marc Fischer said...

Nope!

Mr. Timm said...

U gotta know it's a Brooklyn thang.

gary said...

Jacques Torres chocolateria in DUMBO?

David Marc Fischer said...

mr. t & gary: nope & nope!

gary said...

were you on staten island?

dolph said...

For Valentines might you have been sniffing orchids at the New York Botanical Gardens in the Bronx?

BTW, my last post was automatically entered as Mr. Timm. That's my ID on Google groups. I signed up this week because it's required for grad school. What does Google have to do with Blogger?

gary said...

This is not a guess but a response to Dolph taken from the About Blogger page.

The Story of Blogger

Blogger was started by a tiny company in San Francisco called Pyra Labs in August of 1999. This was in the midst of the dot-com boom. But we weren't exactly a VC-funded, party-throwing, foosball-in-the-lobby-playing, free-beer-drinking outfit. (Unless it was other people's free beer.)

We were three friends, funded by doing annoying contract web projects for big companies, trying to make our own grand entrance onto the Internet landscape. What we were originally trying to do doesn't matter so much now. But while doing it, we created Blogger, more or less on a whim, and thought — Hmmm... that's kinda interesting.

Blogger took off, in a small way, and eventually a bigger way, over a couple years. We raised a little money (but stayed small). And then the bust happened, and we ran out of money, and our fun little journey got less fun. We narrowly survived, not all in one piece, but kept the service going the whole time (most days) and started building it back up.

Things were going well again in 2002. We had hundreds of thousands of users, though still just a few people. And then something no one expected happened: Google wanted to buy us. Yes, that Google

We liked Google a lot. And they liked blogs. So we were amenable to the idea. And it worked out nicely.

Now we're a small (but slightly bigger than before) team in Google focusing on helping people have their own voice on the web and organizing the world's information from the personal perspective. Which has pretty much always been our whole deal.

For more on Google, check google.com. (Also good for searching.)

Ben said...

Corner of Seaman Av & Dyckman St? Bonus point back at you if you remember the reference . . .

David Marc Fischer said...

Not Staten Island. Not the New York Botanical Gardens in the Bronx. And of course not Seaman & Dyckman, a corner of the city that will forever be identified with Jim Carroll's The Basketball Diaries.

And Google is obsessed with getting people's IDs....

Debbie said...

And here I thought Mr. Timm was a new player...at least there's Ben.

How about Yankee Stadium in the Bronx?

David Marc Fischer said...

No, Debbie--it's not Yankee Stadium.

gary said...

City Island?

David Marc Fischer said...

No, Gary.

So far Debbie is the warmest.

gary said...

were you south of the Cross Bronx?

David Marc Fischer said...

Yes, Gary.

gary said...

Were you south of 163rd St?

David Marc Fischer said...

No, Gary.

Scott said...

Valentine Avenue Towing on Valentine Avenue?

David Marc Fischer said...

No, Scott, but I luv the guess!!

gary said...

Were you at the H.W. Wilson Company? I think that is the building you see that has a lighthouse on its roof. I couldn't tell if it was below 163rd St or actually on it from Google maps, but I'll make the guess anywho.

David Marc Fischer said...

No, Gary--I think it's a little cooler than Yankee Stadium.

Debbie said...

The Stella D'oro cookie factory (if it's still there?)

David Marc Fischer said...

I think you've gotten cooler (if I got the factory location right).

gary said...

Were you East of Third Ave?

David Marc Fischer said...

No, Gary.

Dolph said...

Joyce Kilmer Park?

Dolph said...

Wait, Joyce Kilmer Park is too far south. How about Claremont Park?

gary said...

were you in Bathgate?

David Marc Fischer said...

Dolph: No, but between you and Debbie you might be onto something.

David Marc Fischer said...

Gary, I'm getting a little Bronx (and literary) education here...so forgive me if I'm wrong about this...but I think Bathgate has already been excluded....

Dolph said...

John Mullaly Park - the north part of it?

David Marc Fischer said...

No, Dolph, but you could be zeroing in on the location.

Dolph said...

Were you on Shakespeare Avenue?

David Marc Fischer said...

Relatively coolish, Dolph.

Scott said...

Joyce Kilmer Park?

gary said...

Well, my Bathgate guess was based upon my Hagstrom's map which shows Bathgate extending both above and below the Cross Bronx (down into the mid 160's). However, I have discovered on many an occasion the atlas to be wrong and as I don't know the Bronx well, you could be very well right.

My guess is, were you at the Macombs Dam Bridge?

Debbie said...

Does this place exist in the physical world or is this one of those existed-in-the-past-but-is-still-well-and-alive -in-my-head places?

Debbie said...

The High Bridge?

David Marc Fischer said...

Scott, Joyce Kilmer Park is still not it.

Debbie, it's a real place...but not High Brrrrrr-idge.

Gary, I know what you mean regarding maps. I just used a Community Board map. I guess we just have to call 'em as we see 'em. And Macombs Dam Brrrrrr-idge is also cold.

Scott said...

Is there a chicken involved?

Dolph said...

Were you at the Bronx Museum of the Arts at 165th and the Grand Concourse?

gary said...

Were you at the Grand Concourse Library @ 155 E 173rd St?

David Marc Fischer said...

No chickens this time, Scott--at least as far as I remember--but definitely two parrots.

You see, Dolph is correct: I was at the Bronx Museum of Arts (on the Grand Concourse) for Tropicália, an exhibition about a Brazilian cultural movement associated with the late Sixties and early Seventies. I started to take a picture of one Antonio Dias artwork in particular (with Valentine's Day in mind), but an otherwise friendly and helpful security guard intervened. Since then, I have contacted the museum for more info but I haven't heard back.

The two parrots were part of the playful installation-sandbox Tropicália (1967), by Hélio Oiticica.