Friday, January 19, 2007

WHERE WAS I? As usual, it's somewhere in the five boroughs. Leave your guesses in the comments section.
























VISUAL CLUE ADDED JANUARY 20
























BONUS PHOTO
























Photos: David Marc Fischer

11 comments:

Scott said...

Is this a Queens thing?

Debbie said...

Golden Bear Driving Range - Alley Pond Park, Queens

David Marc Fischer said...

Yes, Scott--I'm impressed!

No, Debbie...but for some reason I think that's one of the funniest guesses I've read. And not just in this particular challenge.

Dolph said...

Sunnyside Gardens?

David Marc Fischer said...

No, Dolph. But between you and Debbie, you might be on to something.

Dolph said...

It looks a lot like King Manor in King Park, on Jamaica Avenue between 150th and 153rd Streets in Jamaica, Queens.

David Marc Fischer said...

Dolph, I see what you mean, but that's not the place!

gary said...

Kassina Park?

David Marc Fischer said...

Gary, I don't there is such a thing. But I think I know what you have in mind...and, if I'm not mistaken, it's relatively warm.

Dolph said...

If not King Manor, then I feel good about the Kingsland Homestead, an 18th century landmark located in the Weeping Beach Park in Flushing.

David Marc Fischer said...

Well done, Dolph! After Scott immediately identified the borough, Dolph finessed the contest while raising my awareness of how many "Kings" can be found in Queens.

The location is Weeping Beech Park, a smallish plot of land that is also home to the Kingsland Homestead, the second oldest house in Queens. It is in Flushing, just south of Northern Boulevard and not far from the Quaker Meeting House that Dolph identified in a previous WWI? challenge.

The first photo captures an absence: The eponymous tree, which was brought from Belgium as a shoot and planted in 1847, went to the Great Arboreteum in the Sky in 1998. But the legendary Weeping Beech--the first Weeping Beech in the United States--lives on in the form of its offspring: clones that are part of a rough circle around its former location and countless other weeping beeches all over the country.

The Kingsland Homestead can be seen in the background of the second photo. Built around 1785 by Charles Doughty, it was home to Doughty's son-in-law, Joseph King, for whom the house was named. Later, it was home to other Doughty descendents--the Murrays, for whom Murray Hill was named. But the Kingsland Homestead was originally in a different part of Queens. Before arriving at its current location, this "mobile home" was in two other spots. Currently headquarters of the Queens Historical Society, it is open to visitors--complete with guides, modest museum displays on the first floor, and a sample parlor [see bonus photo] and working library on the second floor. A caretaker resides on the third floor.